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Posts in the "Wages" category

Some Implications of a Living Wage

Posted on October 02, 2015 by Micheál Collins

LW 2015 4

Earlier this week, the inaugural Living Wage Forum was convened to explore the idea and potential of the concept of a Living Wage for the Republic of Ireland.

As part of a contribution from the Living Wage Technical Group, I outlined some of the implications of a Living Wage for employees, employers and the state. The presentation was based on an earlier NERI research paper (see below) which examined the international literature and experiences of Living Wages. In summary, I pointed out that:

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Permanent link | Categories: Labour costsLiving wageWages

Employees and the Self-Employed: an earnings profile

Posted on September 16, 2015 by Micheál Collins

Despite its relevance to broad areas of public policy, detailed assessments of the structure and distribution of the income of workers in the Republic of Ireland has been limited. The latest NERI Research inBrief examines the distribution of work related earnings for both employees and the self-employed.

The key points from the analysis, which use the latest available data which is for 2013, are:

     The distribution of employee income roughly divides into quarters:

  •  26% earn less than €15,000 per annum;
  • 28% earn between €15,000 and €30,000;
  • 24.5% earn between €30,000 and €50,000; and
  • 21.5% earn more than €50,000.

     At the top of the distribution, 5% of employees earn more than €85,000 and 3.5% earn more than €100,000.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityTaxationWages

New Research on Market Income and its Distribution

Posted on August 26, 2015 by Micheál Collins

The latest NERI Research inBrief examines the underlying distribution of market income in the Republic of Ireland.

Market income captures the income received by employees as earnings, the profits of the self-employed and other ‘unearned’ income including rental income, private pension income, investment income and interest income. It is in effect the pre-distribution of income; that which arises before the redistributive mechanisms of taxation and welfare step in.

The key points from the analysis, which use the latest available data which is for 2013, are: 

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityWages

The impact of precarious work on wages, productivity and economic growth

Posted on August 06, 2015 by Daragh McCarthy

Temp Wanted - The economic impact of precarious work blog
The economic impact of precarious work blog

Temporary, short-term forms of employment in the early stages of an economic recovery are a well-established feature of the labour market; however, recent research by the OECD  has raised the concern that this practice has become a more deeply ingrained, lasting characteristic in the world of work. The issue of precarious jobs and the impact this form of employment has on households and the wider economy is gathering an increasing amount of attention from policymakers, academics, civil society groups and media across Europe*.

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Permanent link | Categories: InequalityJobsMacroeconomicsWages

Monday Blog—Review of 2014

Posted on July 27, 2015 by Tom Healy

This week's blog looks back at articles from 2014:

Topic

Date

Main Keyword

Other Keywords

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Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeInequalityInvestmentJobsLiving wageMacroeconomicsTaxationWages

Working, yet living below the poverty line: ‘The Working Poor’

Posted on July 23, 2015 by Micheál Collins

One in every seven of the Irish population (15.2%) lives on an income which is less than the official poverty line – about €202 per adult per week. Given a population of approximately 4.61 million people this implies that just over 700,000 people live at risk of poverty.

In the latest edition of the NERI’s Quarterly Economic Facts document, indicator 5.3 examines the composition of those living below the poverty line in Ireland. The latest data, for 2013, is reproduced in the chart below.

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Permanent link | Categories: InequalityJobsWages

Whose on the Minimum Wage?

Posted on July 02, 2015 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins profile

A new NERI research paper estimates the number of workers on the minimum wage and further profiles these workers by gender, by the sector they work in and by their employment status (full-time, part-time, permanent, temporary etc). The data also allows an examination of the household/family circumstances of workers on the Minimum Wage.

The key findings from the paper are:

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderIncomeInequalityJobsLabour costsWages

From correction to prevention

Posted on May 22, 2015 by Tom Healy

Tom Healy, Director NERI - Tom Healy, Director NERI
Tom Healy, Director NERI

Employment has increased significantly, in the Republic of Ireland, since 2012. This is very welcome. While the details and scale of the increase has been open to statistical interpretation  it is clear that a recovery in output in most sectors of the economy has spilled over into job creation (See Chart 1 below). Unemployment, as estimated on the basis of the ‘standardised unemployment rate’ is now just under 10% of the workforce – a significant psychological threshold last breached in mid-1997 during the last Irish bust/boom of the 1980’s/early 1990s.

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Permanent link | Categories: JobsWages

Employment, wages and economic recovery in the Republic of Ireland

Posted on May 21, 2015 by Daragh McCarthy

Construction - Employment, Wages and Economic Recovery in the Republic of Ireland
Employment, Wages and Economic Recovery in the Republic of Ireland

The headline figure in the Quarterly National Household Survey is a 2.2 per cent increase in employment in the year to the first quarter of 2015. Other notable figures include: 

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Permanent link | Categories: JobsWages

The Male Female income gap

Posted on May 14, 2015 by Micheál Collins

There are many measures examining differences in various socio-economic characteristics among men and women. In general, women are better educated, healthier, live longer but earn less – factors which in themselves point towards gaps in societal equality for both sexes.

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderIncomeInequalityWages

(76 blog posts)