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Posts in the "Labour costs" category

Ireland has the lowest Tax Wedge in Europe

Posted on May 15, 2013 by Micheál Collins

The tax wedge measures the difference between the total labour costs to the employer (wages + employers PRSI) and the corresponding net take-home pay for an employee (gross wages - all income taxes and PRSI). It is generally reported as a percentage of total labour costs.

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Permanent link | Categories: Labour costsTaxation

Public sector clerical workers paid below the OECD average

Posted on May 13, 2013 by Rory O'Farrell

OECD comparison of clerical worker pay - OECD comparison of clerical worker pay
OECD comparison of clerical worker pay

Comparing wages of public sector workers across countries poses many difficulties. Nevertheless the OECD publishes some useful information.

In 2009 public sector clerical workers were paid below the OECD average. This is the latest available data (more timely data should be available in June). The OECD make adjustments for differences in working time and for the cost of living.

Since 2009, due to pay cuts, it is likely that clerical workers have fallen further down the international pay league.

More information on international pay comparisons can be found in the latest edition (Indicator 3.2a) of the NERI's Quarterly Economic Facts.

Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeLabour costs

Labour costs in accommodation and food sector below EU15 average

Posted on October 16, 2012 by Rory O'Farrell

accommodation and food labour costs - EU15 labour costs in accommodation and food sector
EU15 labour costs in accommodation and food sector

Labour costs in the accommodation and food sector are below the average of western European countries. Labour costs include wages, but also employers PRSI, which is far lower in Ireland than most western European countries.

 

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Permanent link | Categories: Labour costs

How much does working cost?

Posted on June 27, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins NERI pic

Being in work, or taking up work, incurs additional costs on households and individuals. Depending on circumstances, additional needs arise regarding travel, fuel, personal costs and childcare among others. While the existence of these additional costs is regularly cited, it is rarely quantified and incorporated into assessments of employment activation or the adequacy of earnings; in particular for low income individuals.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityLabour costs

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