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Posts in the "Jobs" category

Mixed signals from the NI Labour Market

Posted on April 16, 2014 by Paul Mac Flynn

As with buses, in Northern Ireland you wait and wait for economic statistics and then two come at once. Today the figures for the Northern Ireland Composite Economic Index were released. The NICEI is the latest attempt by statisticians to come up with a figure for economic growth in Northern Ireland. Today we learnt that in the final quarter of 2013 growth was +0.6%, marginally below the +0.7% recorded for the UK for the same period. The main increase came from the services sector, while the main decrease came from construction. There is nothing particularly surprising in these figures, it more or less confirms trends most of us are aware of. The main point to take from these figures is that while UK GDP is now 1.5% below where is it was before the recession, Northern Ireland is still 11.2% below its peak. All growth is welcome, but Northern Ireland has some way to go and we would want to pick up the pace.

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Permanent link | Categories: JobsNorthern Ireland

Improving women's access to the labour market could create 65,000 jobs

Posted on April 08, 2014 by Rory O'Farrell

A new paper (available here) highlights some of the most prominent features of the Irish labour market; a polarised labour market with relatively low labour market participation for women. The implication for this is that, by increasing labour market access for women, roughly 65,000 jobs could be created.

Overall in Ireland there are a high proportion of those in employment with a third level degree and the low level of labour market participation for women aged 35 and over, in particular such women without a third level education. Policies directed at enabling such women to participate in the labour market have the ability to increase Ireland’s economic potential.

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderJobsWages

Poverty, Wages and Violence

Posted on March 29, 2014 by Tom Healy

Tom Healy, Director NERI - Tom Healy, Director NERI
Tom Healy, Director NERI

The publication – coincidentally – of two reports in Northern Ireland in the last week has drawn attention to the importance of wages in the Northern economy. While the reports received very extensive media coverage in the Northern media, there was very little in the South. This is regrettable as poverty, wages and community tensions constitute a triad with implications for long-term economic and social stability on the islands of Ireland and Britain. One report, entitled ‘Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion in Northern Ireland’, was published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) and drew attention to the extent of low income and the growth in poverty in Northern Ireland over the last 8 years. The other report, the NERI Quarterly Economic Observer (Spring 2014), focussed on the extent of low pay in the North. Both reports draw attention to the problem of low pay in the UK and Northern Ireland in particular. As the JRF report states: ‘Wages and hours matter, as does the distribution of work across households.’

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Permanent link | Categories: JobsNorthern Ireland Wages

1 in 4 Northern Ireland workers do not earn enough for a decent standard of living

Posted on March 24, 2014 by Paul Mac Flynn

The Nevin Economic Research Institutel published its latest Quarterly Economic Observer today Tuesday 25th March. In it, we examine the extent of low pay across Northern Ireland:

  • 25% of workers earn less than the 'Living Wage' (169,000).
  • 17% are officially classified as low paid (115,000) and 9% (61,000) earn only the National Minimum Wage or less.
  • Young people, women and those in part-time work are most at risk
  • Upper Bann, North Antrim, East L'Derry and Newry & Armagh are hotspots for low pay.
  • Low Pay is widespread in sectors such as Accommodation, Food, Retail, Residential and Social Care.

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Permanent link | Categories: InequalityJobsLiving wageNorthern Ireland Wages

A Living Wage: the impacts for employees, employers and the state

Posted on March 13, 2014 by Micheál Collins

Publication cover - NERI WP Impacts Chall Liv Wage 2014b - Cover image for NERI WP Impacts Chall Liv Wage 2014b
Cover image for NERI WP Impacts Chall Liv Wage 2014b

A discussion on this issue of a living wage has recently commenced in Ireland. The implementation of a living wage raises issues regarding its impact on different actors in society (employees, employers, civil society and the state). Similarly, successful implementation faces a number of challenges.

A new NERI research paper, authored by Micheál Collins, considers some of these impacts and challenges, based on the experiences of living wage programmes elsewhere. In doing so, it points towards issues that need to be considered and addressed as any living wage initiative in Ireland commences.

The paper is available here and complements another NERI working paper on the living wage issued in early March 2014.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeJobsLabour costsLiving wageWages

NERI Seminar: The Irish Labour Market Since the Recession

Posted on March 12, 2014 by Daragh McCarthy

Rory O'Farrell, NERI - Rory O'Farrell, NERI
Rory O'Farrell, NERI

The March NERI seminar took place this afternoon in the INTO Learning Centre. Rory O'Farrell discussed recent trends in the Irish labour market, focusing on the hollowing out of middle paying jobs. Rory is a researcher at the NERI specialising in the labour market and macroeconomics. He previously worked as a researcher in at the European Trade Union Institute, Brussels.

Abstract

Over the past twenty years, globally there has been a ‘polarisation’ of the labour market with middle paying jobs being hollowed out. However, during the construction boom the opposite pattern was seen in Ireland. This raised the question; did the construction boom mask underlying trends in the Irish labour market?

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeJobsWages

Recent labour market changes consistent with polarisation

Posted on March 11, 2014 by Rory O'Farrell

EmploymentIre

Data from the recent Earnings Hours and Employment Costs Survey show that recent trends in employee numbers (employee numbers exclude the self-employed) are consistent with a pattern of polarisation.

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderJobs

A Living Wage for Ireland: Some Considerations and Initial Estimates

Posted on March 05, 2014 by Micheál Collins

Publication cover - NERI WP A Liv Wage for Irl 2014 no12 - Cover image for NERI WP A Liv Wage for Irl 2014 no12
Cover image for NERI WP A Liv Wage for Irl 2014 no12

Over the past decade the concept of a living wage has gained added attention across the developed world. In principle, a living wage is intended to establish an hourly wage rate that should provide employees with sufficient income to achieve an agreed acceptable minimum standard of living. In that sense it is an income floor; representing a figure that allows employees afford the essentials of life.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityJobsLiving wageWages

Employment of young women down 17,100

Posted on February 27, 2014 by Rory O'Farrell

The latest data from the CSO shows employment up roughly 60,000 since the same period of last year, getting close to levels last seen at the end of 2009 (and first seen back in 2005).

Interestingly, of the increase in employment of 61,000, over three quarters almost (47,100) of the increase was for men aged over 35. Employment for men aged under 35 was relatively stable (showing a slight increase of over 3,000).

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderJobs

Youth Unemployment: A problem that is not going away

Posted on February 26, 2014 by Paul Mac Flynn

Youth Unemployment is an issue that is affecting nearly every developed country across the western world. While some labour market and output indicators may show some signs of recovery, youth unemployment is a reminder that the greatest recession to hit the developed world since the great depression has left some wounds that won't heal. While many countries experienced high levels of youth unemployment before the recession owing to structural problems, the current rates reflect a bad situation made worse.

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Permanent link | Categories: JobsNorthern Ireland

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