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Posts in the "Inequality" category

Article highlights income in Ireland

Posted on September 06, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Income Dist 2010 Aontas Article

An article in the current edition of the CPSU's Aontas Magazine by Dr Micheál Collins (NERI) highlights the most recent CSO data on income in Ireland. In particular, the article notes the CSO's findings on the distribution of disposable income - the money households have in their pocket to spend after receiving any social welfare entitlements and having paid their taxes.


In 2010 the CSO found that 30% of households lived on less than €21,000 per annum (disposable income) while 60% of households lived on less than €38,000. Looking at the distribution of disposable income, chart 1 shows the division of income across all households who are classified into ten groups - ranging from the 10% of households with the lowest incomes (bottom) to the richest 10% (top).

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

Average household incomes fall to 2006 levels

Posted on August 03, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins NERI pic

The impact of the recession has been pronounced on the domestic economy. An insight into its impact on households can be established using the latest income data from the CSO's Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC).
In the latest edition of the NERI's Quarterly Economic Facts, indicator 4.3a (p61-62) highlights the changes to average household disposable income over recent years. Disposable income measures the income a household has to spend after it has received all its incomes from employment, self-employment, investment and social transfers and after it has paid all its income taxation. Consequently, it allows us to monitor the collective impact of labour market, wage, earnings, welfare and income taxation changes on households.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

How much does working cost?

Posted on June 27, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins NERI pic

Being in work, or taking up work, incurs additional costs on households and individuals. Depending on circumstances, additional needs arise regarding travel, fuel, personal costs and childcare among others. While the existence of these additional costs is regularly cited, it is rarely quantified and incorporated into assessments of employment activation or the adequacy of earnings; in particular for low income individuals.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityLabour costs

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