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Posts in the "Inequality" category

A Decade of Deprivation: trends 2005-2014

Posted on December 17, 2015 by Micheál Collins

The recently released CSO Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC) provides the most detailed insight that we have into the impact of the recent recession, and evolving recovery, on the day-to-day living standards of people and families in the Republic of Ireland.

One of its indicators tracks deprivation, measured as the percentage of the population who report that they are unable to afford two or more of eleven basic items. These include:

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

NERI Post Budget Seminar

Posted on October 22, 2015 by Daragh McCarthy

Post Budget Seminar, October 2015 - NERI Post Budget Seminar, October 2015
NERI Post Budget Seminar, October 2015

The NERI seminar series resumed yesterday with an analysis of Budget 2016—presentations from each of the three speakers are available below. The speakers outlined the budgetary choices facing Irish society with a special focus on issues related to childcare and housing. Thanks to Michael Taft ( UNITE ), John-Mark Cafferty ( Society of St. Vincent de Paul ) and Dáithi Downey ( Dublin City Council ) for their contribution. The next seminar in the series will take place on 18 November and will focus on ways to boost long-run growth in the economy— further details are available here .  

Slides

Michael Taft & ‘Clear Stark Choices—Budget 2016’ NERI Post-Budget Seminar , 21 October 2015, Dublin

John-Mark Cafferty & ‘Back to the Future’ NERI Post-Budget Seminar , 21 October 2015, Dublin

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Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingInequalityInvestmentMacroeconomicsTaxation

Almost 1 in 5 children live in poverty

Posted on October 15, 2015 by Micheál Collins

This weeks ‘family budget’ has helped highlight the challenges Irish society continues to face regarding the provision of adequate and affordable childcare, the ability of second earners with children to join the labour force and the ongoing need for substantial investment in early childhood care and education.

One context for these children-orientated policy choices is the large number of Ireland’s children that live in poverty. The latest edition of the NERI’s Quarterly Economic Facts document examines these child poverty trends using data from the CSO’s Survey of Income and Living Conditions (indicator 5.1).

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

Who Gains for a Minimum Wage Increase?

Posted on October 06, 2015 by Micheál Collins

As part of next week’s Budget the Government is likely to announce an increase to the statutory Minimum Wage. The increase follows the recommendations of the Low Pay Commission.

The latest NERI Research inBrief estimates some of the effects of the proposed increase in the minimum wage. Specifically, it examines the average impact on the gross pay of minimum wage employees and the overall increase in the level of earnings for these employees.

The key points from the analysis are:

  • 75,000 employees work at the minimum wage.
  • Most are women (65%), most are aged in their 20s and 30s and large proportions of these employees work in sectors such as accommodation and food and wholesale and retail.

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderIncomeInequalityJobsLabour costsWages

Employees and the Self-Employed: an earnings profile

Posted on September 16, 2015 by Micheál Collins

Despite its relevance to broad areas of public policy, detailed assessments of the structure and distribution of the income of workers in the Republic of Ireland has been limited. The latest NERI Research inBrief examines the distribution of work related earnings for both employees and the self-employed.

The key points from the analysis, which use the latest available data which is for 2013, are:

     The distribution of employee income roughly divides into quarters:

  •  26% earn less than €15,000 per annum;
  • 28% earn between €15,000 and €30,000;
  • 24.5% earn between €30,000 and €50,000; and
  • 21.5% earn more than €50,000.

     At the top of the distribution, 5% of employees earn more than €85,000 and 3.5% earn more than €100,000.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityTaxationWages

Little point in many mothers returning to work

Posted on September 09, 2015 by Micheál Collins

It makes little financial sense for many Irish mothers to return to work – that’s the conclusion of a new EU research study looking at the realities of the back-to-work choice faced by women across EU member states.

The study, by Olga Rastrigina and Alina Verashchagina, focuses on the financial gains for families where women return to work. It calculates the ‘Participation tax rate’ (PTR) faced by these earners, which summarises the combined effect of gains in earned gross income, payments of income taxation and social insurance contributions alongside any losses of welfare entitlements. A participation tax rate of 50% implies that half of the gains in earnings from commencing work are lost through changes to taxes and benefits.

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderInequalityJobsTaxation

New Research on Market Income and its Distribution

Posted on August 26, 2015 by Micheál Collins

The latest NERI Research inBrief examines the underlying distribution of market income in the Republic of Ireland.

Market income captures the income received by employees as earnings, the profits of the self-employed and other ‘unearned’ income including rental income, private pension income, investment income and interest income. It is in effect the pre-distribution of income; that which arises before the redistributive mechanisms of taxation and welfare step in.

The key points from the analysis, which use the latest available data which is for 2013, are: 

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityWages

The impact of precarious work on wages, productivity and economic growth

Posted on August 06, 2015 by Daragh McCarthy

Temp Wanted - The economic impact of precarious work blog
The economic impact of precarious work blog

Temporary, short-term forms of employment in the early stages of an economic recovery are a well-established feature of the labour market; however, recent research by the OECD  has raised the concern that this practice has become a more deeply ingrained, lasting characteristic in the world of work. The issue of precarious jobs and the impact this form of employment has on households and the wider economy is gathering an increasing amount of attention from policymakers, academics, civil society groups and media across Europe*.

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Permanent link | Categories: InequalityJobsMacroeconomicsWages

Monday Blog—Review of 2014

Posted on July 27, 2015 by Tom Healy

This week's blog looks back at articles from 2014:

Topic

Date

Main Keyword

Other Keywords

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Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeInequalityInvestmentJobsLiving wageMacroeconomicsTaxationWages

Working, yet living below the poverty line: ‘The Working Poor’

Posted on July 23, 2015 by Micheál Collins

One in every seven of the Irish population (15.2%) lives on an income which is less than the official poverty line – about €202 per adult per week. Given a population of approximately 4.61 million people this implies that just over 700,000 people live at risk of poverty.

In the latest edition of the NERI’s Quarterly Economic Facts document, indicator 5.3 examines the composition of those living below the poverty line in Ireland. The latest data, for 2013, is reproduced in the chart below.

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Permanent link | Categories: InequalityJobsWages

(92 blog posts)