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Posts in the "Income" category

Average disposable income falls 10% since 2007

Posted on December 03, 2012 by Micheál Collins

The experience of recession and austerity over recent years has been widespread. The impact has been greatest on those who lost their jobs since the combined economic, fiscal, banking, property and social crisis hit Ireland - something I highlighted in a paper at the recent NERI Conference 'Responding to the Unemployment Crisis' (details are here).

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

Using Minimum Incomes Research for Policy

Posted on November 28, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Last week I and my fellow researchers on the recent Minimum Income Standards work spoke at an Irish Social Policy Association (ISPA) event on the topic of using minimum incomes for policy analysis and policy planning. In my section of the seminar I highlighted six areas where this research is useful and I have turned these points into a set of slides which are available on the NERI website.


The six areas I highlighted are:

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

Conference highlights Ireland’s Unemployment Crisis

Posted on November 13, 2012 by Micheál Collins

On November 12th the NERI hosted a conference focused on Ireland's unemployment crisis. Over a series of papers the nature of the current crisis and the possible solutions to the problem were examined. The papers and presentations for the conference are now available on the NERI website.


In my own paper, the following were the key points:


Overall Summary

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Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeInvestmentJobsMacroeconomics

Budget 2013 and onwards: choices and consequences

Posted on October 30, 2012 by Micheál Collins

The Society of Saint Vincent DePaul launched their pre-Budget document entitled 'The Human Face of Austerity' on Thursday October 25th. At the launch I spoke about the choices government have as they compile Budget 2013 and reflected on some of the context and consequences of these choices for workers and families in Ireland.


The SVP document, available on their website here, complements much of the research I am colleagues have been engaged with over the past few years on minimum living standards for Ireland. The NERI working paper on the Cost of Work provides a good overview of that research and its findings.


The slides from the seminar are here. The key points raised were:

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Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeInequalityMacroeconomicsTaxation

Income and the Gender Divide

Posted on October 30, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Income and Gender Graph

How do the incomes of men and women compare? How have they changed in recent years and whose income is highest? These are questions that are often asked and speculated upon in the context of male/female earnings and income divisions. Using data from the CSO's Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC) it is possible to reach some answers - something we report in the latest edition of the NERI's Quarterly Economic Facts document (see indicator 4.3b).

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Permanent link | Categories: GenderIncomeInequality

Working Poor are the largest group experiencing poverty

Posted on October 09, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Working poor chart


One in every seven of the Irish population (15.8%) lives on an income which is less than the official poverty line. Given a population of approximately 4.58 million people this implies that almost 725,000 live at risk of poverty.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityJobs

Three-quarters of earners have incomes below €50,000

Posted on September 10, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Tax Case Distribution 2009

Despite its relevance to various public policy issues, information on the levels and distribution of earnings in the Republic of Ireland is limited. Over the next year the NERI plans to address this deficit with research examining incomes and earnings in Ireland based on data from the CSO's Survey on Income and Living Conditions, the National Employment Survey and the Earnings, Hours and Employment Costs Survey.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityTaxation

Article highlights income in Ireland

Posted on September 06, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Income Dist 2010 Aontas Article

An article in the current edition of the CPSU's Aontas Magazine by Dr Micheál Collins (NERI) highlights the most recent CSO data on income in Ireland. In particular, the article notes the CSO's findings on the distribution of disposable income - the money households have in their pocket to spend after receiving any social welfare entitlements and having paid their taxes.


In 2010 the CSO found that 30% of households lived on less than €21,000 per annum (disposable income) while 60% of households lived on less than €38,000. Looking at the distribution of disposable income, chart 1 shows the division of income across all households who are classified into ten groups - ranging from the 10% of households with the lowest incomes (bottom) to the richest 10% (top).

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

Average household incomes fall to 2006 levels

Posted on August 03, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins NERI pic

The impact of the recession has been pronounced on the domestic economy. An insight into its impact on households can be established using the latest income data from the CSO's Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC).
In the latest edition of the NERI's Quarterly Economic Facts, indicator 4.3a (p61-62) highlights the changes to average household disposable income over recent years. Disposable income measures the income a household has to spend after it has received all its incomes from employment, self-employment, investment and social transfers and after it has paid all its income taxation. Consequently, it allows us to monitor the collective impact of labour market, wage, earnings, welfare and income taxation changes on households.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequality

How much does working cost?

Posted on June 27, 2012 by Micheál Collins

Micheal Collins NERI pic

Being in work, or taking up work, incurs additional costs on households and individuals. Depending on circumstances, additional needs arise regarding travel, fuel, personal costs and childcare among others. While the existence of these additional costs is regularly cited, it is rarely quantified and incorporated into assessments of employment activation or the adequacy of earnings; in particular for low income individuals.

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Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityLabour costs

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