Share

Posts in the "Living wage" category

Autumn Statement 2016

Posted on November 23, 2016 by Paul Mac Flynn

The Autumn Statement delivered by the new chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond is the first substantial financial statement made by the government since the BREXIT referendum result in June. Naturally the referendum and its consequences featured heavily in the announcements, but it is still clearly too early to make any definitive forecasts for the longer term.

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingLiving wageNorthern Ireland Wages

Northern Ireland and the Living Wage in 2016

Posted on November 04, 2016 by Paul Mac Flynn

Last week the 2016 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings for Northern Ireland was released and some interesting results emerged. The largest increase in wages was bottom 10% of employees reflecting a welcome boost from the introduction of the National Living Wage. However, the National Living Wage should also not be confused with the real Living Wage, for which the latest rate was announced last week. For 2017 the rate will be £8.45 an hour in all parts of the UK excluding London. The ASHE figures for 2016 show that 28% of all Northern Ireland employees were paid below the Living Wage in 2016. These figures are a 1.5% increase on last year and show the limits of the ability of the governments National Living Wage to make a serious impact on Living standards.

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Living wageNorthern Ireland Wages

2016 Living Wage: no change, yet lots of change

Posted on July 11, 2016 by Micheál Collins

The 2016 Living Wage for the Republic of Ireland has been calculated by the Living Wage Technical Group. It is €11.50 per hour. The rate is unchanged from 2015.

Over the past year there have been decreases in living costs for most items included in the living wage calculation. However, these decreases have been wiped out by increases in housing costs. The overall effect is an unchanged hourly Living Wage rate of €11.50.

The Republic of Ireland Living Wage was established in 2014 and is part of a growing international set of similar figures which reflect a belief across societies that individuals working full-time should be able to earn enough income to enjoy a decent standard of living.

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: IncomeInequalityJobsLabour costsLiving wageWages

Slides from NERI Seminar on The Fiscal Implications of Demographic Change in the Health Sector

Posted on April 21, 2016 by Louisa Gavin

Paul GK Monthy Seminar Fiscal Health

Slides from yesterday's NERI Seminar on The Fiscal Implications of Demographic Change in the Health Sector delivered by Paul Goldrick-Kelly, NERI.  The NERI Working Paper is available here.

 

 

Permanent link | Categories: GenderLiving wage

The National Living Wage - What will it mean for Northern Ireland

Posted on March 30, 2016 by Paul Mac Flynn

50p

The National Living Wage of £7.20 will come into force from tomorrow across the UK for those aged 25 and over. This new minimum wage rate will amount to an automatic increase of 50p per hour for the coming financial year and it is set to rise to £9 per hour by 2020. There has been much discussion of how workers and businesses will be affected by the NLW and this is particularly important for Northern Ireland as one of the lowest paid regions in the UK. In last December's Quarterly Economic Observer we outlined the impact of the NLW among employees and across industries. Overall 13% of workers in Northern Ireland would see an automatic increase in pay from this Friday. However the lower age limit of 25 will exclude some 50,000 workers who will remain on the current minimum wage of £6.70 per hour until November. It also does not take into account those who are currently paid above £7.20 per hour who may see a knock-on increase in their wages.

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: JobsLiving wageNorthern Ireland Wages

UK Autumn Statement and Spending Review

Posted on November 25, 2015 by Paul Mac Flynn

The Autumn Statement delivered today by Chancellor of The Exchequer George Osborne will in all likelihood be remembered for one significant U-turn. The dramatic reversal on planned changes to tax credits represents a big win for opponents of the policy in Westminster and beyond. The total proposed saving from tax credits was to be £4.4bn UK wide. The changes would have affected over 120,000 households in Northern Ireland and would have seen incomes reduced by up to £1600 per annum. At the time of the Summer Budget, the tax credit changes were justified on the basis that other policy announcements would compensate for the loss. Chief among these was the introduction of the National Living Wage. Clearly this proposition has been abandoned and the 2015 NERI Winter Quarterly Economic Observer will outline why the National Living Wage could never have compensate for the loss of tax credits.See here

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingJobsLiving wageMacroeconomics

Sustainable pensions in Northern Ireland

Posted on November 02, 2015 by Tom Healy

Tom Healy, Director NERI - Tom Healy, Director NERI
Tom Healy, Director NERI

In a previous Monday Blog I discussed some issues in relation to ageing population and future pension provision in the Republic of Ireland (Living Long and Living Well?). This Blog focuses on Northern Ireland where many of the same patterns, concerns and long-term questions arise.

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Living wageNorthern Ireland

A roof over your head

Posted on October 02, 2015 by Tom Healy

Tom Healy, Director NERI - Tom Healy, Director NERI
Tom Healy, Director NERI

A roof over one’s head and a safe, comfortable and healthy place that can be called home is a fundamental human right. Just as the issue of land was a central social concern and point of conflict in 19 th century Ireland, the question of accommodation was central to the social movement associated with the rise of trade unionism in the early years of the last century. Much of the social protest movement in both parts of Ireland seen in the late 1960’s was related one way or another to housing – or the lack of it or the quality of it. An extraordinary feature of what came to be known as the celtic tiger period is that huge distortions were created in the supply of housing with inappropriate supply by type, by cost and by location. 

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingInvestmentLiving wage

Some Implications of a Living Wage

Posted on October 02, 2015 by Micheál Collins

LW 2015 4

Earlier this week, the inaugural Living Wage Forum was convened to explore the idea and potential of the concept of a Living Wage for the Republic of Ireland.

As part of a contribution from the Living Wage Technical Group, I outlined some of the implications of a Living Wage for employees, employers and the state. The presentation was based on an earlier NERI research paper (see below) which examined the international literature and experiences of Living Wages. In summary, I pointed out that:

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Labour costsLiving wageWages

Monday Blog—Review of 2014

Posted on July 27, 2015 by Tom Healy

This week's blog looks back at articles from 2014:

Topic

Date

Main Keyword

Other Keywords

Read the full entry »

Permanent link | Categories: Government SpendingIncomeInequalityInvestmentJobsLiving wageMacroeconomicsTaxationWages

< Prev 1 2 3
(27 blog posts)